Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 8] | Managing Labor Costs

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

Managing Labor Costs — Ellen Polishuk via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

If you haven't watched the video series from the Part 3, please do so now, it will help with your understand Veggie Compass and how it helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 

Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 7] | Setting Your Prices: Making Sure You Make a Profit

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

Setting Your Prices: Making Sure You Make a Profit – Jim Munsch via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

If you haven't watched the video series from the Part 3, please do so now, it will help with your understand Veggie Compass and how it helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 

Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 6] | Discovering Prices: What Do Others Charge for Produce?

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

Discovering Prices: What Do Others Charge for Produce? – Jim Munsch via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

If you haven't watched the video series from the Part 3, please do so now, it will help with your understand Veggie Compass and how it helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 

Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 5] | Benchmarking: Making Adjustments Based on Comparisons

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

Benchmarking: Making Adjustments Based on Comparisons — Ellen Polishuk via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

If you haven't watched the video series from the Part 3, please do so now, it will help with your understand Veggie Compass and how it helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 

High school aquaponics greenhouse grows on after pioneer student graduates

In the spring of 2012, Pierre Beauchamp advanced his growing aquaponics experience by designing and building an aquaponics greenhouse at his high school, Del Oro High School, in Loomis, California.

Pierre discovered aquaponics on accident. At the age of 12, Pierre was introduced to hydroponics and built a small system in a backyard greenhouse at home. He learned from monitoring the systems nutrients, and adding the necessary supplements to keep his plants healthy. One morning, after the system had been growing for a few months, Pierre discovered that a frog had discovered his sump tank and decided it was a great place to lay it's eggs. Tadpoles were swimming happily in the sump tank. His appreciation for life motivated him to keep the tadpoles, and his scientific mind started monitoring the nutrients in the system to see what took place. He was excited to find that the nutrient levels maintained and the plant continued to thrive. 

In addition to Pierre's talent and enthusiasm, Del Oro High School had a farm program, and the support of FFA (Future Farmers of America) teacher Regina Dvorak provided the necessary support for Pierre to bring his vision to life. Dvorak arrived at Del Oro H.S. in 1998, and began working on the farm from the beginning. (https://sites.google.com/a/puhsd.k12.ca.us/mrs-dvorak/school-farm-facility)

PIERRE'S AQUAPONICS LESSON PLAN PRESENTATION:

Del Oro Aquaponics
http://www.deloroaquaponics.com

Pierre graduated with the Class of 2014. And the system grows on thanks to Mrs. Dvorak's commitment and sweat, administrative and community support, innovation, and help from the FFA students. The FFA Supervised Agriculture Experience project ties directly into the school farm and the aquaponics greenhouse. Dvorak explains:

For their SAE projects, students work in the greenhouse on the aquaponics system, plant seeds and propagate plants for resale, maintain the garden boxes and other planting areas, learn about landscape maintenance, complete irrigation projects, prune the fruit trees and raise livestock.  Each spring we showcase our farm and students projects through our annual open house and plant sale.  Every Friday, students work outside on the farm either for their projects or as a collaborative effort to maintain the gardens and growing areas.

To raise funds, the students collect recyclables from the school campus, as well as complete the requirements for the agriculture incentive grant funding available each year through agriculture education.

The developments of the Del Oro farm program, have become the foundation for  a four-year educational program Dvorak is creating, called "Farm-To-Fork" The pathway for interested students consists of:

  1. Ag Science (pre-req) -take as a freshman;
  2. Ag Bio (not as a prereq; open to take as a sophmore, ideally in conjunction with Culinary 2)
  3. Culinary 1 (pre-req) - take as a freshman or sophmore;
  4. Culinary 2 (open to take as a soph or junior)
  5. Farm-To-Fork - take as a junior or a senior
    1. Agriculture - 6 weeks (perhaps breaking it up into 3 week sections)
    2. Culinary - 6 weeks (same)
    3. Internship
      1. Farm - 3 weeks
      2. Restaurant - 3 weeks

The two biggest challenges Dvorak faces, aside from pests, is time and summer mainetance. With school out of session, Dvorak spends a significant amount of her personal time tending to the farm and the aquaponics greenhouse to keep it running. The harvest she collects is preserved through canning and freezing to be used by the culinary classes the following year. To assist in the time needed to keep the farm running, Dvorak is reaching out to local community colleges and universities to arrange work based internship programs. 

To close, I will share Edutopia's wonderful segment about Pierre and the Del Oro aquaponics greenhouse. 

How Gardening Enables Interdisciplinary Learning
High school student Pierre combined biology, math, economics, and more to transform his campus greenhouse into a sustainable aquaponic system that provides fresh vegetables for the cafeteria.
OCTOBER 29, 2013

The Aquaponics Association does not have any affiliation with Del Oro High School or Del Oro Aquaponics. This blog series is a showcase of educational programs, presentations, and aquaponics projects; for the purpose of sharing the work and results being conducted in schools, colleges, and universities around the world.

Is there a school, college, or university you know of that is involved with aquaponics? Let us know, so we can share it:

Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you?

Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 4] | Using Individual Crop Budgets

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

Using Individual Crop Budgets — Jim Munsch via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

If you haven't watched the video series from the Part 3, please do so now, it will help with your understand Veggie Compass and how it helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 

Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 3] | Analyzing and Making Decisions with Veggie Compass

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

  • Managing Your Farm as a Business — Jim Munsch (Sun 3/8)
  • Whole Farm Profit Management — Ellen Polishuk (Weds 3/11)
  • Analyzing and Making Decisions with Veggie Compass — Ellen Polishuk (below)
  • Using Individual Crop Budgets — Jim Munsch (Weds 3/18)
  • Benchmarking: Making Adjustments Based on Comparisons — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 3/22)
  • Discovering Prices: What Do Others Charge for Produce? – Jim Munsch (Weds 3/25)
  • Setting Your Prices: Making Sure You Make a Profit – Jim Munsch (Sun 3/29)
  • Managing Labor Costs — Ellen Polishuk (Weds 4/1)
  • Pulling It All Together: Making Decisions for the Coming Season — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 4/5)

Analyzing and Making Decisions with Veggie Compass by Ellen Polishuk via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

If you haven't watched the video series from the last post here, please do so now, it will help with your understand Veggie Compass and how it helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.

Happy Sunday :)

Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 2] | Whole Farm Profit Management

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

  • Managing Your Farm as a Business — Jim Munsch (Sun 3/8)
  • Whole Farm Profit Management — Ellen Polishuk (below)
  • Analyzing and Making Decisions with Veggie Compass — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 3/15)
  • Using Individual Crop Budgets — Jim Munsch (Weds 3/18)
  • Benchmarking: Making Adjustments Based on Comparisons — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 3/22)
  • Discovering Prices: What Do Others Charge for Produce? – Jim Munsch (Weds 3/25)
  • Setting Your Prices: Making Sure You Make a Profit – Jim Munsch (Sun 3/29)
  • Managing Labor Costs — Ellen Polishuk (Weds 4/1)
  • Pulling It All Together: Making Decisions for the Coming Season — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 4/5)

Whole Farm Profit Management — Ellen Polishuk via SSAWG (download pdf)

These resources are FREE from SSAWG. They encourage you to share these “farmer-friendly” tools widely. 

SSAWG intention is to continue to add to this body of resources, as funding permits.

The first major piece of this online course is a video series that helps farmers understand some of the hidden factors influencing their profitability. This video series is a step-by-step demonstration of how a tool called “Veggie Compass” can be used to give small and mid-scale horticultural farmers a much fuller picture of their farm finances than regular recordkeeping systems provide. This is not a sales pitch for this particular free tool. Whether you actually decide to use Veggie Compass yourself is not as important as learning the concepts this tool allows us to demonstrate.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you?


Growing Farm Profits e-Course [Part 1] | Managing Your Farm as a Business

This Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group's online course was developed for farmers and for those who help farmers develop more sustainable farming enterprises. While this course will definitely have a vegetable production slant, many of the concepts and principles discussed will be informative to other producers.

SSAWG is providing a range of materials they expect will be helpful to you on your path to growing your farm profits. Many of the educational materials and recordkeeping tools provided here are ones they use in their popular Growing Farm Profits classroom trainings. To ensure that these resources have useful practical application in the real world of farming, these resources were largely developed with considerable input from farmers.

We will be providing this course to you in the following sections twice a week (on Sunday) and Wednesdays):

  • Managing Your Farm as a Business — Jim Munsch (below)
  • Whole Farm Profit Management — Ellen Polishuk (Weds 3/11)
  • Analyzing and Making Decisions with Veggie Compass — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 3/15)
  • Using Individual Crop Budgets — Jim Munsch (Weds 3/18)
  • Benchmarking: Making Adjustments Based on Comparisons — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 3/22)
  • Discovering Prices: What Do Others Charge for Produce? – Jim Munsch (Weds 3/25)
  • Setting Your Prices: Making Sure You Make a Profit – Jim Munsch (Sun 3/29)
  • Managing Labor Costs — Ellen Polishuk (Weds 4/1)
  • Pulling It All Together: Making Decisions for the Coming Season — Ellen Polishuk (Sun 4/5)


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 



Sacramento State University of California shares recent lecture on Farming with Fish.

On February 19, 2015, the STEM Lecture Series at Sacramento State, in Sacramento, California featured Dr. Dudley Burton, Professor in the department of Environmental Studies and Dr. Brook Murphy, Lecturer in the Environmental Studies and Biological Sciences department at Sacramento State. Dr. Burton and Dr. Murphy showcased how aquaponics fits into the Sustainable Technology Optimization Research Center (STORC) at Sacramento State.

The presentation, titled, "Farming with Fish: Aquaponics and Urban Agriculture in Sacramento" outlines what aquaponics is, how aquaponics works, and propose answers to the sustainability of aquaponics. Click the title below to watch the recording of the lecture.

Farming with Fish: Aquaponics and Urban Agriculture in Sacramento

For more information on SacState's STEM Lecture Series, please visit:
http://www.csus.edu/stem/STEM%20Lecture%20Series/Lecture%20Archive.html

The Aquaponics Association does not have any affiliation with Sacramento State University. This blog series is a showcase of educational programs, presentations, and aquaponics projects; for the purpose of sharing the work and results being conducted in schools, colleges, and universities around the world.

Is there a school, college, or university you know of that is involved with aquaponics? Let us know, so we can share it:


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you?

Building a Sustainable Business | A Guide to Developing a Business Plan for Farms and Rural Businesses | SARE

Building a Sustainable Business: A Guide to Developing a Business Plan for Farms and Rural Businesses brings the business planning process alive to help today's alternative and sustainable agriculture entrepreneurs transform farm-grown inspiration into profitable enterprises. Sample worksheets lend a practical perspective and illustrate how real farm families set goals, researched processing alternatives, determined potential markets, and evaluated financing options. Blank worksheets help the reader develop a detailed, lender-ready business plan or map out strategies to take advantage of new opportunities.

Enter Our Fish Photo Contest!

1424902296820.jpeg

Have a great photo of one or more of your fish? If it’s unique and interesting enough, you could win a prize. And we’ll publish it in our newsletter and on our website and Facebook page, along with a blurb about you and what you do. Get out your camera and get in the running. Please read the contest rules below. Happy snapping!

Contest rules:

- The photo must be original, taken by you, and relevant to aquaponics.

- The photo must be in color, saved in .jpg format, with a file size no larger than 64 MB.

- The photo must not be altered in Photoshop or in any other way other than to make it clearer or reduce the file size (cropping is okay).

- Attach the photo to an email addressed to: newsletter@aquaponicsassociation.org

- In the email, include your name and phone number, and a paragraph describing when, where, and why the photo was taken, and what is unique or interesting about it.

- Send the photo in before March 15, 2015.

- There will be first place, second place, and third place winners. Winners will be notified by email by April 1, 2015.

- First place winner to receive their choice of Fish Feed (20 lb bag of sinking pellets or a 13 lb bag of floating pellets, shipped free in the US) sponsored by our generous Affiliate,  Thank you John!


- The winning photos will be published on the Aquaponics Association website and Facebook page, along with a paragraph or two about each photographer.

- Judges will be drawn from the Aquaponics Association Board of Governers. The decision of the judges is final.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you? 

Why Decoupled Aquaponics

One of the great things about aquaponics is the ability to have a fully integrated system, where the fish and the plants balance one another. The well-known research system at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) is a great example of such a system: integrated and balanced.

Yet more and more, we hear talk of decoupled aquaponics, where the fish and the plants are managed separately, though they ultimately do share resources. Let's explore some of the reasons why decoupled aquaponics is gaining popularity for farmers:

    1. When an aquaponic system is decoupled (or easily decouple-able), each of the two portion of the system (plants, fish) can operate optimally without concern about the other portion. This means that the plants can be run off a separate reservoir which could be filled with water from the fish or switched out to standard hydroponic solution, at need. Similarly, the fish have adequate filtration independent of whether the plant portion of the system is at exactly the right stage of growth to perfectly absorb the nutrients and ammonia produced by the fish.
    2. If food safety certification is required, the water from the fish can be sanitized to eliminate all concern, whether this is achieved by pasteurization, ozonification, or purification using ultraviolet (UV) light.
    3. "Decoupled" systems allow other sources of animal byproducts to be used as nutrient sources, as long as they have been purified of pathogens. This would allow, for example, "aquaponics" to be done without any fish at all, using ducks, chickens, rabbits, or even cows.
    4. With a decoupled system, it becomes possible to shut down part of the system for a few months. This is often done in temperate regions where short days and cold temperatures make it economically prohibitive to grow plants, but there is still a desire to continue with cultivating the fish.
    5. If some part of the system becomes contaminated, it becomes possible to continue with the rest of the crop, even though some portion of the system might need to be quarantined and/or sanitized.

Have any questions about what it means to have a decoupled aquaponics system? Please add your comments below.


Interested in supporting education and research to allow aquaponics to be sold in a store near you?


United Nations FAO Manual on Aquaponics now available

In 2014, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) came out with a 288-page publication on aquaponics.

The formal name of this document is "Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper No. 589: Small-scale aquaponic food production Integrated fish and plant farming." The nine chapters and appendices cover the principles involved in small-scale food production using aquaponics.

The chapters cover:

  1. An Introduction to Aquaponics, including a brief history and modern uses of aquaponics, including humanitarian aid (pp. 1-10)
  2. Understanding the Biological Components of an Aquaponic System, with emphasis on the Nitrogen Cycle (pp. 11-20)
  3. Water Quality in Aquaponics, including DO, pH, hardness, and parasites (pp. 21-34)
  4. Design of Aquaponic Systems (pp. 35-74)
  5. Bacteria in Aquaponics, including nitrifiers, anaerobic bacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria (pp. 75-82)
  6. Plants in Aquaponics, including plant selection (pp. 83-102)
  7. Fish in Aquaponics, including biology and fish selection (pp. 103-122)
  8. Management Practices, including setting up a system, routine maintenance, system safety, and troubleshooting (pp. 123-140)
  9. Additional Topics in Aquaponics, including wicking beds, saline aquaponics, and much more (pp. 141-156)

The appendices are also packed with information, covering:

  • Vegetable production guidelines for 12 common aquaponic plants (pp. 169 - 182)
  • Plant pests and disease control (pp. 183-186)
  • Fish pests and disease control (pp. 187-190)
  • Calculating the amount of ammonia and biofilter media for an aquaponic unit (pp. 191-192)
  • Making homemade fish feed (pp. 193-198)
  • Key considerations before setting up an aquaponic system (pp. 199-204)
  • Cost-benefit analysis for small-scale aquaponic units (pp. 205-208)
  • Step-by-step guide to constructing small-scale aquaponic systems (pp. 209-248) and
  • Aquaponics quick-reference handout (pp. 249-262)

Given that this is a UN document, and all but three nations use metric, those in the US, Liberia, and Myanmar may have some difficulty with the dimensions given. However, if such folks remember that 25mm is an inch, a meter is roughly a yard, and a liter is roughly a quart, that will cover most of the dimensions that might be otherwise confusing.

If you are new to aquaponics, a gardener, or a small-scale farmer, I highly recommend you give this new FAO document a read!

We love our members!

Keeping the spirit of Valentine’s Day alive, we want to express our appreciation and let you know we are working behind the scenes to improve our outreach so we can serve all of you better.  

As part of this effort, we are busy updating our website and preparing some exciting original material that will be published in an upcoming online version of our newsletter. Look for an email announcing its delivery in the near future.

Help us to help you.

Whether you’re a small-time beginner or an experienced commercial grower, we want to hear what would help you grow your business or pursue your passion. Let us know what types of articles and other content you’d like to see in the newsletter the future.

And, we’d love to have you participate in its ongoing creation. Join our newsletter team, or contribute some original content. Is there an article you’d like to write or have already written about some aspect of aquaponics? Do you have a new product or technique that you want other folks to know about? Are you an expert about an aquaponics topic?

We hope to hear from you with your contributions or ideas.