Putting Up Shoots Programs!!

Please see the tentative programs for all three days of the Aquaponics Association’s 2018 Conference, Putting Up Shoots:

Putting Up Shoots Tentative Friday Program

Putting Up Shoots Tentative Saturday Program

Putting Up Shoots Tentative Sunday Program

The conference is jam-packed with aquaponics goodies:

-FOUR site tours;
-SIX expert panel discussions;
-THIRTY-SIX presentations from the world’s top experts
-TWO hands-on build demonstrations;
-TWELVE moderated group breakout discussions;
-ONE special aquaponics banquet and presentation;
-TWO networking happy hours; and
-The International Aquaponics Vendor Showroom!

WOW, hope you can make it! Check out the conference homepage for ticket info: https://aaasociation.wpengine.com/2018-conference/

 

Vendor Showroom at Aquaponics Conference

Do you have a cutting-edge product or service that you’d like to share with aquaponic growers from around the world?

Do you want your business info shared with thousands of Association followers?

Then you’re in luck! We still have vendor tables left in the vendor showroom at the upcoming Putting Up Shoots Conference. All vendor tables include 1 full conference ticket, a “vendor spotlight” media post, recognition as a contributor in the conference program, and one year of Association Membership.

Vendor tables start at $700

Here’s the conference homepage where you’ll find information about vendor tables: http://bit.ly/2NZ4WTV

We hope to see you soon!

Speaker Spotlight: Officer Michael McLeon

“The Michael Unit” started with a bathtub and solo cups and through trial and error has developed low-cost commercial aquaponic systems from used and recycled parts. From the development of this system the Michael Unit Field Force went on to win State Grand Champion in the “Herb Behind Bars” competition as well as developed community outreach programs that has helped over 800 families in need and wish to share the experiences and knowledge they have gained through developing an aquaponics program in a correctional environment.

The long term goal is to grow many salads every week within the walls of prisons across the US with aquaponics. Just another example of how aquaponics is transforming our food economy!

Get your Putting Up Shoots tickets today! — http://bit.ly/2NZ4WTV

The Ripple Effect

The Ripple Effect: How Aquaponic Conferences Grow Community and Remove Barriers

By Kate Wildrick

My name is Kate Wildrick, Co-Founder / Paradigm Shifter of Ingenuity Innovation Center.  For those of you who were able to attend the 2017 Putting Down Roots Conference in Portland, Oregon, I served as one of the conference co-chairs.  Since then, I have had an active role as a strategic advisor to the Aquaponics Association. My intention in writing this article is to share my personal, first hand experience of how attending an aquaponic conference can really serve as a powerful catalyst for building community, knowledge and resources.  This is my story.

My business focuses on creating sustainable solutions and sharing them using an open-source platform.  Aquaponics is one of the many things that we do. In 2012, my husband and I struggled our way through a mountain of (dis)information on the internet to find the best way to build an aquaponics system.  After moving onto 20 acres of land in St. Helens, Oregon on a lease to buy option (this is important later in my story), we set up a 1,500 square foot greenhouse and began constructing our system based off of Murray Hallam’s CHOP2 (Constant Height, One Pump) System.  At the time, I was working at a food manufacturing facility. With access to lots of food grade containers (also known as Intermittent Bulk Containers or IBC’s), we created a system working with resources we could repurpose and “upcycle.” This also included building with a lot of reclaimed wood.

As we built our system row by row, our friends told others.  Before we knew it, we were hosting regular tours and helping people get introduced into how aquaponics works.  We made every mistake in the book and shared what we learned to help others save money, time and frustration. Many encouraged us to go into designing and building systems and growing commercially, but my husband and I knew that we lacked the knowledge.  Nonetheless, we kept at it. We made new mistakes, met new people and kept expanding.

In 2014, we learned that Murray Hallam would be speaking at the Aquaponics Association’s Conference in San Jose, CA.  Too broke to attend, another colleague suggested we reach out to him and invite him to speak at our center. He made an introduction, and before I knew it, I was talking to Murray on Skype.  He accepted our invitation. With less than 30 days to promote the event, we somehow managed to pull it off. We sold every last seat!

2017 Putting Down Roots Conference Speakers, Portland, OR

Given the huge success, Murray decided that he wanted to return each year (which he did) to do his four day master class at our center.  The wealth of knowledge and connections made at these events were simply phenomenal. We learned even more about system design, commercial production, pest management and nutrient deficiencies.  Not only were we able to learn from Murray, but we connected with others who had small and large farms all over the world. We were able to discover the challenges and opportunities they were personally facing.  It was comforting to know that we were not alone in pioneering this emerging green industry.

In 2016, I attended the Austin, TX Aquaponics Association’s Conference as a speaker.  I had submitted a proposal to share what we had learned first hand about leveraging aquaponics as a community builder.  This was the first conference where I was able to meet many of my national colleagues. It was so exciting to meet each of these people who we had been following on YouTube and social media.  I returned home with many new connections and a bigger perspective on what was happening on the national and global fronts with the industry. Best of all, I was starting to connect the dots on how to position what we were doing to meet the growing demand of people needing access to living examples of various aquaponic designs and business and community models.

Brian Filipowich and Kate Wildrick, Co-Chairs of the 2017 Putting Down Roots conference take a moment to celebrate the turnout for the event.

In summer 2017, Brian Filipowich (now current Chairman of the Aquaponics Association), reached out to me to get my thoughts on hosting the Association’s annual conference in Portland.  We had met at the Austin conference, and we shared a lot of passion for cultivating the aquaponics community. I thought it would be a wonderful opportunity to bring some of the cutting edge leaders and pioneers to the Pacific Northwest, as I knew many in my network would benefit and see how this is a real industry and it is not a fad.  Knowing I had to step up my whole event planning game to the next level, Brian and I set off to find a venue and get promoting.

This event was a huge blessing for me.  At the time, my family and I had been dealing with a devastating blow to our business and life.  We chose to leave the beautiful land we were on when we found out our friend and investor had no interest in honoring our initial agreements.  (Serving for 5 years on our advisory group, she watched us try to secure the land. The high risk venture of “aquaponics” and a business model that had never been done before left us with few conventional options.)  Having no desire to be bound by values that did not align to ours, we uprooted our whole life in 45 days and moved into a one bedroom basement at our friends’ house. Here my husband, mother-in-law, two year old son and I regrouped and wondered what new things would come our way.

The 2017 Putting Down Roots Conference became my sole focus.  With a limited amount of time to put together such major event, I knew it was going to take a lot to pull this off.  As the schedule came together, I began to revisit connections who had come through our center along with an Aquaponic Meetup Group we run to promote the conference.  On the state level, we belonged to an aquaculture task force that was established to bring together public and private organizations to strengthen and develop the aquaculture industry in Oregon.  We served as the voice for aquaponic industry. Often not taken seriously, we knew that this was our opportunity to show the State of Oregon what is possible. So, we gifted the Oregon Aquaculture Association a table at the conference to hear the speakers and connect with attendees.

When the conference happened, I was so excited.  Even though our business and home had been uprooted,
what was clear was that we had very strong roots in our community that aquaponics had helped us create.  During the event, we were able to bring attendees on a tour of an aquaponic R&D center that we were helping build for a new business venture,
Wind River Produce, in the Columbia River Gorge.  As with any build, we got to learn how to make things better.  Next, we went on a second tour to a food innovation center, The Redd, that serves as a business incubator and explored Live Local Organic, an urban application of an indoor aquaponic facility.  The owner, Joel Kelly, had come through our center many years ago hoping to find more information on how to do commercial aquaponics.  The tours were helped tell a story of how aquaponics could bridge the urban and rural divide, which has been a major discussion in the agriculture industry on a local and national level.

Arvind and Gayathri Venkat of Waterfarmers reconnect with Murray Hallam and Nick Savidov, Ph.D.

We also heard the heartbreaking stories of other aquapreunuers that had faced similar challenges that we had encountered.  We were not alone in dealing with the reality that there were a lack of resources to help grow this industry. It dawned on me that by telling our story,  that we could give permission for others to share theirs. Together, our voices could be heard.

After the conference, we took a short break only to find that we had ignited something big.  Beyond seeing an increase in our consultation services, new doors began opening up. The Oregon Food Bank wanted to collaborate and bring aquaponics to their headquarter location.  Discussions around aquaponic training for veterans and people of color began, and funds were sourced to build systems.  Other non-profits and for-profits sought to collaborate and see how they could get more aquaponic farms and community applications going on a local level.  The conversation had shifted. Instead of “making the case” for why aquaponics could solve a lot of issues, people and organizations began were now asking what they could do to help grow the industry.

Based on this feedback, we began focusing our efforts on developing pathways that could funnel this energy in a way that would be beneficial for all.  Given that we had nothing to lose and everything to gain, we decided to develop an aquaponic co-op venture that would help establish standards, best practices and workforce training to grow the industry.  Working with Murray Hallam and his student Arvind Venkat from Waterfarmers, we decided to expand the Wind River Produce model to serve as a way to grow and develop farms and farmers in the Pacific Northwest while alleviating the barriers that many have had to go through.  Working off of a solid and replicable commercial farm model and training curriculum, we then could adapt these processes and designs to integrate with the local food system and culture.

One unexpected, yet incredible surprise of hosting the Putting Down Roots Conference was the response that we received from Clint Bentz, the President of the Oregon Aquaculture Association.  After attending the conference, he was absolutely ecstatic as to what aquaponics could do for the State of Oregon. After meeting and relaying on what he learned to several of the task force members, the association asked me if I would be willing to help them put on an Oregon version of the aquaponics conference.  Working with another co-chair and aquaponic farmer, Michael Hasey of Oregon’s largest aquaponic farm, The Farming Fish, we set out on another short deadline to showcase what was happening with aquaponics on a local level.  The conference took place the weekend of June 23rd, 2018, and drew more than 70 people, including Oregon’s 1st District State Representative, David Brock Smith, who extended his support for growing the state’s aquaculture and aquaponics industries.  Here, the pioneers of the Oregon aquaponic movement shared their organization’s vision, challenges and desire to meet the growing demand for high quality, organic produce.

Reflecting on this conference, I still get emotional.  With the exception of a few speakers, I knew most everyone’s story, challenges, and triumphs.  I was in a very unique position as the Master of Ceremonies to help ask the questions and highlight the opportunities for collaboration to shift the industry on a local level.  Like my own experience at the Austin conference, many of these speakers had not ever met one another before or knew of their projects or farms. Together we told the collective story through our own stories.  We shared how we had moved the mark and explained what was needed to keep going. What happened at the end of the conference then took my breath away. People who attended began offering up resources. Business planning, CPA services, land, supplies, financial assistance were just a few I can recall.  I remember looking at the speakers who were still there and smiling. We had brought our local community together to help remove the barriers. We had even managed to raise another $1,000 to help the STEM students who presented at the Putting Down Roots conference fund their program in our local schools.

When you participate in an aquaponic conference, you give energy and support for those  who are the front lines. Your presence demonstrates that this is a growing movement, and one  that is not going away. You may never know how your interactions impact others and inspire innovation.  You may not realize how your words can encourage new results. My hope is that by sharing my story you can see how the ripples can come back in very unexpected and awe inspiring ways.  It is through these events that I find my inspiration to keep going.

Become Part of the City that Feeds Itself

By joining us for the 2018 Putting Up Shoots Aquaponics Association Conference, you’re becoming a part of something much bigger than aquaponics. In Hartford, CT, we’re making an impact on the city’s food ecosystem by becoming a part of the City that Feeds Itself™.

The City that Feeds Itself is the leading mission of Connecticut’s own Trifecta Ecosystems, our local conference partner. Trifecta is creating incentives for communities to grow their own food, while raising awareness about sustainable farming through education, workshops, and city projects.

With this year’s conference (our biggest yet!), we’re not only raising awareness about one of the most sustainable methods of farming, we’re also supporting local education, farmers in and around Hartford, the growth of food for local communities, and so much more. Learn more about the CFI here: https://bit.ly/2BWGjDR

Become a part of something bigger; register for “Putting Up Shoots” today! http://bit.ly/2NZ4WTV

Speaker Spotlight: Peter Hill

Do you struggle to get delicious fresh food for your family every night? Would you like your children to be involved in farming and food preparation for meals? Are you worried about eating store produce because you know how some big farms might operate? Do you like great tasting food? Would you like to sell your extra at the farmers market, or share with your neighbors?

Is your church or community organization fighting food scarcity and quality? Would workforce training in computer design, carpentry, project management, farm operation, marketing, and distribution be beneficial in your community?

Interested in being a part of the 30% growth in organic food demand over the next ten years? No pesticides, no rolling stock, or wastewater permits. Low operating cost. Small footprint. Big payout!

We start with your concerns and production goals, add location, schedule, and a budget estimate. That gets us talking and arriving at the best solution for you. You get the education at the right time.

Peter Hill is an engineer that solves problems, creates digital solutions and teaches the information to others. My experience comes from life and the farm. My tools are Sketchup, Xcel, PowerPoint, paper, pencil and a ruler.

My solutions are in freshwater shrimp farming with a patent (aquaculture), saltwater farming (mariculture), industrial equipment human interface (process), IOT design (mechatronics) and aquaponic farm design. I currently teach at Anne Arundel Community College, Maryland. Previously, an assistant professor of physics, Illinois, high school biology teacher, Virginia, and engineer.

Let’s start your Aquaponic Farm design! Contact: Grow@SustainableDesign.Farm

Speaker Spotlight: Dr. Baker and Dr. Beecher

Speaker Spotlight – Dr. Kimberly Baker & Dr. Lance Beecher, Clemson University Cooperative Extension

“Promoting Spinach Consumption and Sustainable Agricultural Practices in South Carolina Schools using Aquaponics”

(Aquaponics Research & Food Safety Track)

Kimberly Baker:

Dr. Kimberly A. Baker completed her Ph.D. in Food Technology from Clemson University in 2016.  She is a registered and licensed dietitian and a trained chef.  Dr. Baker serves as the Food Systems and Safety Program Team Leader and State Consumer Food Safety Program Coordinator with the Clemson University Cooperative Extension.  Dr. Baker is also a certified Seafood HACCP Trainer and Instructor (Association of Food and Drug Officials), certified Food Safety Preventive Control for Human Food and Animal Food Lead Instructor (Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance), certified Produce Safety Alliance Lead Trainer (Produce Safety Alliance) and ServSafe® Instructor/Proctor (National Restaurant Association).  

Lance Beecher:

Dr. Lance Beecher serves as an Extension Associate and State Specialist with the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service. He received a Ph.D. from Clemson University in Environmental Toxicology and a M.S. and B.S. from Louisiana State University in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology. His background includes extensive work in aquaculture and aquaponics projects for over 25 years. His area includes recirculating system filtration and water quality management. Presently he is managing a 2500 gallon aquaponics system evaluating nutrient dynamics, sterilization techniques and aquaponics food safety protocols.  

 

This session will discuss a project conducted by Clemson Cooperative Extension about promoting spinach consumption and sustainable agricultural practices in South Carolina schools using Aquaponics.  The goals of this project were: 1) to increase nutritional knowledge and consumption of leafy green vegetables; 2) to enhance good handling practices and food safety during production and preparation; and 3) to promote South Carolina sustainable production practices, focusing on Aquaponics.  Two classes from two high schools participated in the project in which the class teacher was taught how to run an aquaponics system; and teach the students pre-determined learning content.  Lesson topics included: safe food handling, food safety of produce and nutrition and cooking of spinach.  Students and teachers were given a pre-test and post-test in order to evaluate knowledge gained.  This session will discuss how the project was implemented, project results and how this can be incorporated into other schools nationwide.  

Make sure you register for the conference today. Time is running out

Aquaponics in STEM Education

By Julie Flegal-Smallwood

According to Economic Modeling Specialists International (2017), STEM jobs will grow 13% between 2017 and 2027, while other career options will grow 9%. In addition, STEM jobs have a median salary of almost twice that of non-STEM jobs. The majority of STEM careers require at least some college, and most students, regardless of level, consider math, science, and other similar classes to be the hardest and most challenging. At the college level, this is often the reason many of my students are ready to graduate but still need to fulfill a college-level mathematics requirement. This is particularly true for low-income, minority, underprepared, or first generation college students.

 Aquaponics continues to be a content area which easily blends many aspects of STEM, and can turn “I can’t” attitudes into “I can”.  It allows students to be engaged in a real-world, important application of STEM. Redlands Community College in El Reno, OK has a robust Aquaponics program associated with two degrees  and a certificate program related to Agricultural Sustainability.

 Last year, I had a non-traditional (in almost every sense of the word) student who sat on the back row the first night of class, and looked as if he might bolt out the door at our break time. As a 36-year old Marine veteran, who also happened to be Native American and a first generation college student, Jason was dubious. He took the class only because he needed a 4-hour class to round out his schedule, and didn’t think it would have much “science and math stuff”.

With each class period he became more engaged, and by midterm asked if he could design a system for his home as his research requirement. Late at night, I would get text messages with pictures of the welding he had been doing or some tanks he had found to use in his homegrown approach. Our schedule included Saturday lab days and field trips, and he asked to bring his wife and children so they

 could learn more about his new passion. By the time we reached fish dissection, his 9-year old daughter was fixture in the class as well.

A year later, his life is much different. Instead of wondering if he could complete community college, he has upped his goals and wants to get a graduate degree in Microbiology or Chemistry, and hopes to work in the Aquaponics industry. In the meantime, he has three systems at home, is working on another one, and is a permanent volunteer in our greenhouse. He credits aquaponics at helping him break through significant PTSD issues, giving him a goal, and passing on some excitement to his five children, three of whom are girls.

 

We  have a STEM Track at this year conference. Check out our STEM Education Conference Discount.

Aquaponics Across Connecticut!

The Putting Up Shoots Conference features tours of four sites across the great state of Connecticut.

Guests will get a first-hand look at all angles of aquaponics: commercial, food safety, community, research, and STEM education.

Tours will inform afternoon sessions and team-building. We will identify ways that Connecticut growers are breaking down barriers and growing more with aquaponics, and how we can all apply these lessons.

Check out the Putting Up Shoots Conference Homepage for ticket info.

Also check out the draft Putting Up Shoots Schedule.

Email community@aquaponicsassociation.org for questions.

Hope to see you there!

 

 

Yemi Amu: Aquaponics Design for Small-Scale Production

From city lots to classrooms, aquaponics is a good fit for any urban space, no matter the size. Yemi Amu, a New York City aquaponics professional with over a decade of farming experience, shares in this talk practical design considerations and best practices for creating aquaponics systems in unconventional spaces. Yemi’s guidelines for design, building, materials and plant selection will benefit those interested in growing a diverse selection of fish and crops in small spaces or on a limited budget.

In this talk participants will learn:

  • How to design for your space
  • Designing systems for a purpose (such as production or education)
  • Designing aquaponics systems for scalability
  • Designing systems for ease of use and functionality
  • Selecting materials for a budget
  • Appropriate fish and vegetable choices

About Oko Farms

Founded in 2012, Oko Farms is an aquaponics education, production and design/build company in Brooklyn. Oko Farms operates New York City’s largest and only outdoor aquaponics farm located in Bushwick, Brooklyn. Every year, hundreds of visitors, ranging from public school students to government officials, learn about sustainability and ecosystems by visiting our unique and diverse aquaponics farm.

Our 2,500 square foot aquaponics system houses a variety of freshwater animals, including channel catfish, tilapia, crawfish, freshwater prawns, gold fish, koi, and bluegill. Plants cultivated include rice, lemongrass, mint, okra, peppers, spinach, beans, leeks, chamomile, tomatoes, eggplant, and many more. Our system also features a number of aquaponic farming methods, including deep water culture, ebb and flow, and nutrient film technique.

About Yemi Amu

Yemi Amu is the founder and farm manager of Oko Farms. She directs all of Oko Farms’ programs including education, design/build projects and community related activities. For the past decade, she has facilitated the creation and maintenance of over 20 edible spaces throughout NYC; created and implemented various culinary, nutrition and gardening programs for both youth and adults; and promotes aquaponics as a tool for environmental awareness and stewardship. Yemi has a M.A. in Health and Nutrition Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She was awarded Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center, Rising Star in NYC Food Policy (2016).